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The courts take offences against Police Officers extremely seriously

Under Section 60 of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW), it is important to explain that the definition of ‘Police Officer in the execution of duty’, in this section, refers to an officer who is either on duty at the time of the offence, is targeted as a result of action made by an officer whilst on duty, or is simply targeted because it is known that they are a police officer.

Therefore, a person is guilty of assault and other actions against Police Officers if they assault, harass, stalk, intimidate or throws a missile at a Police Officer, whilst the Officer is in the execution of duty.

The following penalties apply to this offence:

A person found guilty of assault and other actions against Police Officers, where no actual bodily harm is caused, is liable to imprisonment for 5 years.

A person found guilty of assault and other actions against Police officers, where actual bodily harm is caused, is liable to imprisonment for 7 years.

During a public disorder, a person found guilty of assault and other actions against Police Officers, where no actual bodily harm is caused, is liable to imprisonment for 7 years.

During a public disorder, a person found guilty of assault and other actions against Police Officers, where actual bodily harm is caused, is liable to imprisonment for 9 years.

As well as the above charges, a person who causes grievous bodily harm or wounds an officer in the execution of duty, and causes bodily harm to that officer or any other person in a reckless manner, may face the following charges:

  • A person found guilty of recklessly wounding or causing grievous bodily harm to a police officer, is liable to imprisonment for 12 years.

During a public disorder, a person found guilty of recklessly wounding or causing grievous bodily harm to a police officer, is liable to imprisonment for 14 years.

Disclaimer : This article is just a summary of the subject matter being discussed and should not be regarded as a comprehensive legal advice for you to defend yourself alone. If you are charged with criminal offences, it is recommended that you seek legal assistance from criminal lawyers.

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