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When you receive a summons to appear before the court to answer a criminal charge  it will be in your best interest to obey the summons and appear in court.

Appearing in court will allow you to enter a plea to the charge, it will allow you to cross-examine the witnesses presented by the prosecution and it will allow you to present your own evidence. It is best to appear in court in obedience to summons issued by the court.

If you receive a summons to appear before the court, chances are there has been a complaint filed against you. It could be a civil complaint or a criminal complaint. In either case, the summons you received is an order from the court directing you to appear at a stated time and place.

It is wise for you to obey the summons and appear before the court. Failing or refusing without just cause to appear before the court after a summons has been issued by the court is an act in contempt of the court. This means that you are snubbing the court and not giving the court the respect it deserves.

When you fail or refuse to appear as directed by the court, will issue a warrant for your arrest so that you will be forced to appear before the court. When you receive a summons, obey the summons. Appear in court so that you will not waste your day in court. If a summons has been issued and served on you and you still refuse or fail to appear in court, you will be unable to enter a plea; you will not be able to answer the charges against you.

Only the evidence for the prosecution or the evidence from the person who is suing you will be heard by the court. Your evidence and any defences you may have will not be heard by the court. Then the case will be decided without your evidence.

If you fail or refuse to appear in court, you will not be able to hear the evidence against you. You will not be able to scrutinize the evidence that the prosecution will present against you. If the prosecution succeeds in presenting evidence that proves your guilt beyond reasonable doubt, you will be convicted by the court.

Disclaimer : This article is just a summary of the subject matter being discussed and should not be regarded as a comprehensive legal advice for you to defend yourself alone. If you are charged with criminal offences, it is recommended that you seek legal assistance from criminal lawyers.

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